OP-ED

One revolutions spits on another

By Fakhri al-Arashi

Over the past fifty years of the country moving forward, personal behavior remained the best excuse for lack of achievement anywhere. As if I were not aware of the five decades that have passed in my mind, I still remember the school gathering, the National anthem and the revolutionary holidays in which nationalism and love of terror were major headlines for brides.

The former government remained in place for the past three decades, frightening people with the imamate ruling era. Since the revolution of Yemen in 1962, the situation in the country changed much in organization and public services. For many, the past 33 years under the former president were great years, for they offered a better infrastructure and less pain that many have felt since the crisis. This theory is put forward by our parents, who lived both during the Imamate era and in that of the former president.

Both were bad examples of good governance, though the current government is much worse than both of them. We were very excited by the revolution to see a change take place, but the change does not seem to want to come in such a country, where selfishness and the building of empires are the key factors behind making quick wealth.

The real revolution, like the European revolutions of the past, has not come yet to middle eastern countries, nor Yemen in particular. We dream of harvesting the grapes of the revolution, and yet no one believes in their own duties or the rights of others. At the National Dialogue, the place where people outside of meeting rooms think that the future makes a difference, key, prominent persons, along with heads of working groups and even lawmakers have shown they would prefer to have their personal guns inside the meeting rooms than respect ethics and laws.

It’s quite sad to feel that another fifty years will not be enough to see the dreams of the people come to fruition. Safety, stability, economy have been left behind. For all we know, the current government may simply take up criticizing whatever government comes next, just like the former president’s media now speaks out against the current regime.

The victim of these unfaithful revolutions are the people who work and fight for change, but despite their efforts, they see no change.