Political Analysis

This Month:Yemeni Film & Arts Festival comes to UC Berkeley

National Yemen

Village in Yemen

The first-ever International Yemeni Film & Arts Festival comes to UC Berkeley on April 19, 2014! This event will include screenings of selected films by filmmakers from Yemen and around the world, discussions with YPP staff and special guests, and exhibitions of new photography from Yemen.

Photographs will be on display from 12:00pm – 6:30pm, with film screenings beginning at 12:30pm.

This event is free and open to the public.

  • SESSION 1: 12:30PM-2:30PM

    Days in The Heart of the Revolution: Hudaydah, Ammar Basha. Yemen, 2013, 13 minutes. Selected excerpts from this series of short documentaries examine the myriad challenges facing the fishing communities of the Red Sea coast.

    Socotra: H’er wa Imshin, Felisa Jimenez. Yemen & Colombia, 2013, 36 minutes (World Premiere). This hauntingly beautiful documentary explores the social changes that have come to the remote Yemeni island of Socotra in recent years.

    Sheffield Steel, Yemeni Dreams, Emma Vickers & Cathy Soreny. UK, 34 minutes (US Premiere). This short film tells the story of a generation of men, now entering old age, who migrated from colonial South Yemen to Britain in the 1950s and 1960s to work in Sheffield’s burgeoning steel industry. These men and their families laid the foundations for one of the UK’s strongest immigrant communities.

    The Last Harvest, Jonathan Friedlander & Erik Friedl. USA, 2012, 23 minutes. This documentary, produced by UCLA researcher Jonathan Friedlander, explores the lives of Yemenis who settled in California’s San Joaquin Valley. At the peak of migration, some 5,000 Yemenis were employed in the fields of central California. Today only several hundred remain.

    Serra Castle Incident, Ammar Banafea. Yemen, 2012, 3 minutes (World Premiere). This found-footage-style short is Yemen’s first science-fiction film.

    • SESSION 2: 3:00PM-5:00PM

      Photo, Sawsan al-Areeqe. Yemen, 2012, 4 minutes. This simple but eloquent allegory celebrates the light women bring to Yemeni society despite all attempts at repression.

      A Stranger in Her Own City, Khadija al-Salami. Yemen, 2005, 29 minutes. In her first documentary, al-Salami shadows 13-year-old Nejmia, a girl who flouts custom by playing in the streets of Old Sanʻa “like a boy” and refusing to wear the hijab. Nejmia laughs off the taunts and curses of her neighbors, and captivates the viewer with her indomitable spirit.

      Adults Only, Mohammed al-Asbahi. Yemen, 2013, 3 minutes. This haunting short was made to shed light on the cruelty of underage marriage.

      The President’s Man and His Revolutionary Son, Nawal al-Maghafi. Yemen, 2011, 37 minutes. This film, made during the 2011 revolution, focuses on the relationship between regime spokesman ‘Abdu al-Janadi and his pro-revolution son. Through the story of these two men, al-Maghafi tells the story of a divided country trying to overcome a generation of dictatorship.

      Karama Has No Walls, Sara Ishaq. Yemen, 2011, 26 minutes. Jumʻat al-Karama, the Friday of Dignity, on which pro-regime gunmen murdered over 50 revolutionary activists and wounded hundreds, marked a turning point in Yemen’s popular uprising of 2011. Filmmaker Sara Ishaq tells the story of the Karama massacre and its aftermath through the eyes of activists and their families. This film was nominated for an Academy Award for best short subject documentary, the first such achievement for a Yemeni film.

      A Scarred Generation, Mike Healy. Yemen, 2013, 10 minutes (World Premiere). Featuring interviews with one of Yemen’s few mental health practitioners, this IRIN film sheds light on the impact of violence and trauma on Yemen’s children and adolescents.

      The Big House, Musa Syeed. Yemen, 2013, 5 minutes. When a young boy finds a key to the empty mansion down the street, he lets himself and his imagination run wild in the big house.

      • SESSION 2: 3:00PM-5:00PM

        Photo, Sawsan al-Areeqe. Yemen, 2012, 4 minutes. This simple but eloquent allegory celebrates the light women bring to Yemeni society despite all attempts at repression.

        A Stranger in Her Own City, Khadija al-Salami. Yemen, 2005, 29 minutes. In her first documentary, al-Salami shadows 13-year-old Nejmia, a girl who flouts custom by playing in the streets of Old Sanʻa “like a boy” and refusing to wear the hijab. Nejmia laughs off the taunts and curses of her neighbors, and captivates the viewer with her indomitable spirit.

        Adults Only, Mohammed al-Asbahi. Yemen, 2013, 3 minutes. This haunting short was made to shed light on the cruelty of underage marriage.

        The President’s Man and His Revolutionary Son, Nawal al-Maghafi. Yemen, 2011, 37 minutes. This film, made during the 2011 revolution, focuses on the relationship between regime spokesman ‘Abdu al-Janadi and his pro-revolution son. Through the story of these two men, al-Maghafi tells the story of a divided country trying to overcome a generation of dictatorship.

        Karama Has No Walls, Sara Ishaq. Yemen, 2011, 26 minutes. Jumʻat al-Karama, the Friday of Dignity, on which pro-regime gunmen murdered over 50 revolutionary activists and wounded hundreds, marked a turning point in Yemen’s popular uprising of 2011. Filmmaker Sara Ishaq tells the story of the Karama massacre and its aftermath through the eyes of activists and their families. This film was nominated for an Academy Award for best short subject documentary, the first such achievement for a Yemeni film.

        A Scarred Generation, Mike Healy. Yemen, 2013, 10 minutes (World Premiere). Featuring interviews with one of Yemen’s few mental health practitioners, this IRIN film sheds light on the impact of violence and trauma on Yemen’s children and adolescents.

        The Big House, Musa Syeed. Yemen, 2013, 5 minutes. When a young boy finds a key to the empty mansion down the street, he lets himself and his imagination run wild in the big house.

      • The 2014 Festival will also feature photographs by the following artists:
        Yusra Ahmad
        Yusra is a young Yemeni-Canadian activist and amateur photographer. She holds a bachelor’s degree in business administration. Yusra currently lives and works in Sanʻa, Yemen.

        Yumna Al-Arashi
        Yumna is a professional photographer based between Los Angeles and New York City. Named an up-and-coming journalist by Forbes Magazine, Yumna works to break barriers and capture beauty while documenting raw human experience.

        Ruba Aleryani
        Ruba is an undergraduate at Brown University studying Development Studies and Media. She is a writing fanatic, and aspires to combine her interest in development and her passion for photography and filmmaking to shed a light on the untapped. In 2013 she was awarded the Davis Projects for Peace Grant. She is also the co-founder of a new student publication, Vagabond Magazine.

        Alex K. Potter
        Alex is a photojournalist from the Midwest living in the Middle East. She is currently based between Lebanon and Yemen. Since 2012 she has been chosen for the Chris Hondros Student Fellowship, Lucie Foundation Emerging Scholarship (2012, 2013), PDN Photo Annual Award, and American Photography 29 Award, among other honors.

        Ghada Al-Wazeer
        Ghada is an accomplished Yemeni photographer based in Sanʻa, Yemen. Her portfolio includes fashion photography, portraiture, and street photography, as well as photojournalism. She is a graduate of the Lebanese International University, with a degree in Public Relations.

        Jenna Zabarah
        Jenna is a Yemeni-American photographer and a senior at George Mason University. Raised in the Washington DC metropolitan area, Jenna has developed a strong interest in documentary photography of the political/activist scene in the nation’s capital. Her other hobbies include traveling, fitness, and studying law.