Lifestyle

More qualified midwives needed to decrease maternal deaths

National Yemen

midwaves meetings

Asma al-Mohattwari
One of the most beautiful moments in life is the magnificence of a new birth, when a mother’s pain mixes with her baby’s tears and the joys of people around her. However, a slowdown in the decline of maternal and child mortality rates often turns these moments into a tragedy.
Official reports indicate that infant mortality in Yemen is one of the highest in the world, and accounts for 69% of young children’s death. The rate of maternal mortality is also very high, at 365/100, 000 births. One of the primary causes is a lack of sufficient health care and highly-qualified midwives.
The National Association of Yemeni Midwives, with support from the United Nations Fund for Population, concluded that new training programs are necessary to reduce mortality rates. One campaign has taken place in Ibb, where sessions lasted two weeks from April 27th to May 8th.
Chairwoman of NAYM Sua’ad Qasem said that the program targeted ten midwives, and expressed her hope that the partnership with UNFP will continue boosting maternal health standards in Yemen.
“I hope that the midwives who have participated the training program are taking it seriously out of their obvious concern for the health of the mother and children, as well as a desire to provide quality service in the areas where they work.”
Secretary-General Fatoom of NAYM Noor al-Deen explained that the main objective of the course was to improve the profession, and enable it to go even further in its provision of reproductive health services for Yemeni women.
She also highlighted that the Ibb sessions operate within the framework of previous sessions in Socotra, Hadramout, Abyan, and Ibb itself.
Reproductive Health Office Supervisor Aqela Ahmad Ebadi, who works in Ibb, said that although midwives do their best, there are still shortcomings which mean that they would benefit from training and also refresher courses.
During the training, participants learned about practices adopted by the NAYM to help them contribute to upgrading the standard of midwifery in Yemen.