OP-ED

Between the anvil of Hadi’s nonchalance and the hammer of the Houthi’s intransigence, Yemen is being crushed.

By Rabab Ayesh

For long periods, Yemen has seen various forms of political instability, but the recent years mark the worst time in Yemen’s history. Yemen has seen a lot of serious turmoil that is forever etched in all Yemenis’ memories.

The lack of political stability and the civil war, as well as the economic challenges, are leading to a continuation of psychological warfare.  

Nowadays, Yemen stands between two sides; the international community’s ” legitimate government”, which is a mere pro forma force operating from Riyadh, and the illegal government operating from the homeland known internationally as the Houthi rebels.

These two powers are both claiming legitimacy. President Hadi and his government deny the legitimacy of the Revolutionary Committee dominated by the Houthi group. For their part, the Houthis have denied the legitimacy of Hadi and his government since their resignation in January. 

Since the beginning of the political crisis in Yemen, Yemen has heard of many so-called governmental reforms in different fields. Sometimes, the new reforms and decisions are dictated by the Houthis and are rejected by Hadi. On the other hand, Hadi’s new reforms are strongly rejected by the Houthi militias. It is worth mentioning here that these reforms are just ink on paper and that no actual implementation has been carried out. 

“Hadi has no legitimacy, especially after he betrayed the country by giving it to Saudi Arabia on a golden plate. Saudi Arabia practices its power on the helpless innocents,” said Anwar Alshami, a Houthi member from Mahweet.

For several months, Yemen has been living under the domination of these two forces who claim the power of decision-making in Yemen.

“It becomes hard for us to say which is which. In a glimpse of an eye, we hear of many reforms.

We feel that we are lost. 


A question that is raised here is if, for instance, President Hadi appointed someone as a governor of Marib and the Revolutionary Committee appointed another, who would be the legitimate governor of Marib?

The two parties’ reforms are not recognized by most Yemenis. We believe that neither Houthis or Hadi have the legitimate authority to make such crucial decisions. “Both Hadi and the Houthis are secret agents serving foreign agendas. They know nothing about patriotism,” stated Sara Faisel, a college student from Ibb.

Observers believe that if the current complicated situation continues for long, Yemen will be threatened with further descent into chaos. For that reason, many observers stress that the current situation must come to an end, otherwise the country is likely to end up with more fragmentation and balkanisation.

If Yemen does not soon begin to move forward by having one power that controls the different aspects of the country and by making reforms that help Yemen to overcome their challenges, Yemen will inevitably be left behind for ever.