In The Media

Ould Cheikh in Aden Soon to Discuss Revised U.N. Proposal

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Written by NY Staff

Aden- U.N. Envoy to Yemen Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed will soon arrive at the temporary Yemeni capital, Aden, informed Yemeni sources told Asharq Al-Awsat on Wednesday.

The sources said Ould Cheik will carry a revised version of his vision for a political solution in Yemen, after the legitimate Yemeni government rejected the envoy’s first paper for ignoring to bring peace based on the terms of reference stated in U.N. Security Council Resolution 2216, the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC)’s initiative, its executive mechanism and the outputs of the comprehensive national dialogue.

The U.N. envoy plans to convene a meeting of the De-escalation and Coordination Committee (DCC) in Jordan before the committee members return to Dhahran Al-Janoub, in Saudi Arabia.

Ould Cheikh also seeks to revive peace talks during his regional tour that he kicked off in the Saudi capital, Riyadh, after the U.N. Security Council decided to place the Yemeni issue outside its agenda, and therefore, gave the envoy a chance to fix the peace talks.

Political sources close to Ould Cheikh told Asharq Al-Awsat that his new mission would be difficult in light of the militia’s stringent positions and their refusal to accept the U.N. resolutions, particularly the issue of handing over their arms and their withdrawal from Aden.

The envoy’s visit to Aden comes as fighting escalated at the majority of frontlines and after the balance of power changed on the ground.

Lately, forces from the Yemeni National Army recuperated significant strategic areas in the western coast, mainly in Dhubab and Al-Omari camp, considered as the military protection line for the Bab al-Mandeb Strait.

The Yemeni forces are now on their way to al-Makha camp, a historic and strategic area, which in addition to the other liberated areas of Lahij and Taiz, constitute an important spot for Houthis, who had benefited from this line to smuggle Iranian arms to the Yemeni coast, using fishing boats.

Original Article